Dog Vaccines

first_vet_visit.jpgRABIES VACCINE:

Rabies is a virus that affects the nervous system of animals.  Our pets can contract this virus via bitewound from an infected animal.  This is a lethal virus that humans can contract, which is why the law requires our dogs be vaccinated against rabies (Lane County Animal Code).

Our Protocol: The rabies vaccine is first given to dogs between 4 and 6 months of age, re-vaccinated at 1.5 years of age, and then re-vaccinated every three years thereafter.

COMBO VACCINE (DHP/P):

This vaccine is four shots in one, and it protects dogs against distemper, hepatitis, parainfluenza, and parvo viruses.  None of these animal forms can be contracted by humans.

Our Protocol: The combo vaccine is given at 8 weeks of age, again at 12 weeks of age, and then parvo only at 16 weeks of age.  The dog should be re-vaccinated at 1 1/2 years of age,  and then every three years thereafter.

dog_and_toy.jpgBORDATELLA VACCINE:

This vaccine is given to dogs to prevent "kennel cough".  It is generally required if your dog will be staying at a boarding kennel, but is recommended if your dog is in frequent contact with strange dogs (dog parks).

Our Protocol: The vaccine lasts for 1 year, but some kennels may require the vaccine be given just prior to boarding.  An intranasal vaccine should be given 2 weeks prior to boarding, or an injectable vaccine should be given 1 month prior to boarding.

LEPTOSPIROSIS:  This is an infectious disease that causes serious illness in dogs, other animals and people throughout the US and around the world.  Leptospirosis causes a variety of flu-like symptoms, but it can develop into a more severe, life-threatening illness that affects the kidneys, liver, brain, lungs and heart.  the most common way to become infected with leptospirosis is by coming into contact with the urine of infected animals-usually in water or wet ground.  Dogs become infected by swimming in or drinking contaminated water or by playing in areas where infected urine is present.  We start out with a series of two injections that are given 4 weeks apart then is an annual vaccine at that point.  If you haven't started this vaccination series for your dog, please ask us about it at your next visit with us.

OTHER VACCINES:
Corona Virus:  There are a large number of different corona viruses.  We do not typically vaccinate for them, due to their low risk in our region of Oregon.
 

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Our Regular Schedule

Monday:

8:00 am

5:30 pm

Tuesday:

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5:30 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am

7:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am

5:30 pm

Friday:

8:00 am

5:30 pm

Saturday:

9:00 am

1:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed

Closed

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